Thursday, January 10, 2019

2019 NYU Tax Policy Colloquium

As it's now less than two weeks to showtime, here is an update on our speaker schedule for the 2019 NYU Tax Policy Colloquium, now including most paper titles:

SCHEDULE FOR 2019 NYU TAX POLICY COLLOQUIUM

(All sessions meet from 4:00-5:50 pm in Vanderbilt 208, NYU Law School)

1.      Tuesday, January 22 – Stefanie Stantcheva, Harvard Economics Department. “Taxation and Innovation in the 20th Century.”
2.      Tuesday, January 29 – Rebecca Kysar, Fordham Law School. “Unraveling the Tax Treaty.”
3.      Tuesday, February 5 – David Kamin, NYU Law School.  TBD.
4.      Tuesday, February 12 – John Roemer, Yale University Economics and Political Science Departments. “A Theory of Cooperation in Games With an Application to Market Socialism.”

5.      Tuesday, February 19 – Susan Morse, University of Texas at Austin Law School. “Government-to-Robot Enforcement.”
6.      Tuesday, February 26 – Li Liu, International Monetary Fund.  “At a Cost: The Real Effects of Transfer Pricing Regulations.”
7.      Tuesday, March 5 – Richard Reinhold, Willkie, Farr, and Gallagher LLP.  [The parsonage allowance and the establishment clause.]
8.      Tuesday, March 12 – Tatiana Homonoff, NYU Wagner School. “Encouraging Free Tax Preparation Among Paper Filers: Evidence from a Field Experiment.”
9.      Tuesday, March 26 – Michelle Hanlon, MIT Sloan School of Management.  TBD.

10.  Tuesday, April 2 – Omri Marian, University of California at Irvine School of Law. “The Making of International Tax Law: Empirical Evidence from Natural Language Processing.”
11.  Tuesday, April 9 – Steven Bank, UCLA Law School. “Manufacturing Tax Populism.”
12.  Tuesday, April 16 – Dayanand Manoli, University of Texas at Austin Department of Economics. “Tax Enforcement and Tax Policy: Evidence on Taxpayer Responses to EITC Correspondence Audits.”
13.  Tuesday, April 23 – Sara Sternberg Greene, Duke Law School.  A Theory of Poverty: Legal Immobility.”
14.  Tuesday, April 30 – Wei Cui, University of British Columbia Law School. “The Digital Services Tax: A Conceptual Defense.”

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