Thursday, December 22, 2016

Upcoming NYU Tax Policy Colloquium

Starting a month from tomorrow, Rosanne Altshuler and I will be co-hosting the 22nd(!) NYU Tax Policy Colloquium. Here is our schedule for the semester. All sessions meet from 4 to 5:50 pm in Vanderbilt 208 at NYU Law School.

1.  Monday, January 23 – Lily Batchelder, NYU Law School. “Accounting for Behavioral Biases in Business Tax Reform: The Case of Expensing.”
2.  Monday, January 30 – Mark Gergen, Berkeley Law School.  “How to Tax Global Capital.”
3.  Monday, February 6 – Alan Auerbach, Berkeley Economics Department. “U.S. Inequality, Fiscal Progressivity, and Work Disincentives: An Intragenerational Accounting.”

4.  Monday, February 13 – Allison Christians, McGill Law School.  “Human Rights at the Borders of Tax Sovereignty”
5.  Tuesday, February 21 – Jason Oh, UCLA Law School. "Are the Rich Responsible for Progressive Marginal Rates?"
6.  Monday, February 27 – Stephen Shay, Harvard Law School. “’A Better Way’ Tax Reform: Theory and Practice.”
7.  Monday, March 6 – Scott Dyreng, Duke Business School. “Trade-offs in the Repatriation of Foreign Earnings.”
8.  Monday, March 20 – Daniel Hemel, University of Chicago Law School.  "Federalism as a Safeguard of Progressive Taxation."  
9.  Monday, March 27 – Leonard Burman, Urban Institute.  “Is U.S. Corporate Income Double-Taxed?”

10.  Monday, April 3 – Kathleen Delaney Thomas, University of North Carolina Law School.  “Taxing the Gig Economy.”
11.  Monday, April 10 – Julie Cullen, UC San Diego Department of Economics. “Political Alignment and Tax Evasion.”
12.  Monday, April 17 – Miranda Perry Fleischer, University of San Diego Law School.  “The Libertarian Case for a Universal Basic Income.”
13.  Monday, April 24 – Joel Slemrod, University of Michigan Business School.  “Taxing Hidden Wealth: The Consequences of U.S. Enforcement Initiatives on Evasive Foreign Accounts.”
14.  Monday, May 1 – Richard Vann, University of Sydney Law School.  "International tax post-BEPS: Is the corporate tax really all that bad?”

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